The Institute seeks to ensure that all New Jersey residents live in a society that respects their humanity, provides equality of economic opportunity, empowers them to use their voice in the political process, and protects equal justice.

 

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Marking Juneteenth: The Ongoing Quest for Freedom in New Jersey

Watch our Juneteenth panel of Institute experts discussing how to #DoRacialJustice in this critical moment.

 

The Institute was proud to host the 1619 Project's Nikole Hannah-Jones and an esteemed panel.

 Watch the livestream here

 

"The United States is a nation founded on both an ideal and a lie."

With her unvarnished 100k at the role of slavery and its legacy on the making of our nation, Nikole Hannah-Jones tells us that "[w]ithout the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different—it might not be a democracy at all."

In front of a sold-out crowd at NJPAC, the award-winning journalist discussed the NYT Magazine's 1619 Project, a multi-media initiative marking the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Black people in Jamestown, Virginia, the system of slavery that followed, and its enduring legacy in America.

Nikole was introduced by Shané Harris (Executive Director, The Prudential Foundation), and joined by a distinguished panel of scholars and advocates, moderated by Marcia W. Brown (Rutgers University- Newark), who brought the conversation home to New Jersey. Panelists included Ryan P. Haygood (President and CEO, New Jersey Institute for Social Justice), Prof. Elise Boddie (The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School), Rev. Charles F. Boyer (Pastor and Founder Of Salvation and Social Justice), Marley Dias (Creator of #1000BlackGirlBooks campaign) and Richard Roper (Public Policy Consultant).

Presented in association with the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, Prudential, The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School, and Salvation & Social Justice

Hear from NJ Youth about What They Need to Stay Out of the Criminal Justice System

 

In the News

NJ Redistricting Proposal Could Delay Minority Representation

August 04, 2020

NJTV's Raven Santana reports

Monday morning members of the Assembly Judiciary Committee held a meeting via Zoom to discuss a proposed constitutional amendment that would keep current district lines in place until the 2023 election, for a total of 12 years, instead of the 10 now mandated in the constitution.

Assemblyman John McKeon, the sponsor of bill ACR188, says due to the uncertainty of COVID-19, he’s concerned the state won’t have the most up-to-date census data, which is why he proposed the amendment.

“If we’re concerned about a census undercount in these communities of color, we should also be concerned with how delaying the drawing and implementation of a new redistrict map is going to also impact these same communities of color,” said Helen Kioukis, program associate for the New Jersey League of Women Voters.

As Covid Delays Census, Lawmakers Seek To Extend Outdated Map

August 04, 2020

NJ 101.5's Michael Symons reports

New Jersey’s population has changed significantly since 2010, but a delay in the census has state lawmakers pushing to run one more election on the decade-old legislative map.

COVID-19 will delay the completion of the census by at least four months, blowing up the schedule for adjusting district boundaries for 2021 elections. Democrats plan to ask voters to amend the constitution to delay redistricting until the 2023 cycle, despite New Jersey’s rapid diversification and changing growth patterns.

How Can NJ's Municipalities Make Progress Toward Racial Justice?

August 04, 2020

NorthJersey.com's Alexis Shanes reports

While calls abound for federal and state initiatives to address systemic racism, experts and New Jersey activists are pushing for change community by community, looking to the state’s 565 municipalities for justice-oriented change.

They are fighting to keep the momentum going, sparking unprecedented reckonings about race and pushing for change that they say is long overdue, even as the large-scale protests that gripped the U.S. in June slow to a trickle.

“Black and brown people know this is the reality,” said Liza Chowdhury, a social sciences and criminal justice professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College. “What’s happening now is that all of America is waking up to the reality of Black people in this country.”

Given the significant challenges we face, we have only two options: to embrace chaos or embrace community. We choose community. Join us as we work to bend our neighborhoods toward the beloved community.

 

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