Community

Over

Chaos

The Institute seeks to ensure that urban residents live in a society that respects their humanity, provides equality of economic opportunity, empowers them to use their voice in the political process, and protects equal justice.

 

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The Institute was proud to host the 1619 Project's Nikole Hannah-Jones and an esteemed panel.

 Watch the livestream here

 

"The United States is a nation founded on both an ideal and a lie."

With her unvarnished 100k at the role of slavery and its legacy on the making of our nation, Nikole Hannah-Jones tells us that "[w]ithout the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different—it might not be a democracy at all."

In front of a sold-out crowd at NJPAC, the award-winning journalist discussed the NYT Magazine's 1619 Project, a multi-media initiative marking the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Black people in Jamestown, Virginia, the system of slavery that followed, and its enduring legacy in America.

Nikole was introduced by Shané Harris (Executive Director, The Prudential Foundation), and joined by a distinguished panel of scholars and advocates, moderated by Marcia W. Brown (Rutgers University- Newark), who brought the conversation home to New Jersey. Panelists included Ryan P. Haygood (President and CEO, New Jersey Institute for Social Justice), Prof. Elise Boddie (The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School), Rev. Charles F. Boyer (Pastor and Founder Of Salvation and Social Justice), Marley Dias (Creator of #1000BlackGirlBooks campaign) and Richard Roper (Public Policy Consultant).

Presented in association with the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, Prudential, The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School, and Salvation & Social Justice

Learn About the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice

 

In the News

'The Wire' Actor Michael K. Williams Puts Star Power Behind Prisoner Reentry Initiative

February 25, 2020

TapInto.net's Mark J. Bonamo reports

NEWARK, NJ — When Michael K. Williams played the legendary character of Omar Little on the well-known TV show "The Wire," Omar had a famous line: "You come at the king, you best not miss."

When Williams came to Newark earlier this month to talk about the challenges faced by former prisoners seeking to re-enter society, one of the best traits of Omar Little came to life. The real-time Williams came armed with double-barreled words of hope, not with Omar's trusty shotgun. But just like Omar, Williams's weapon of choice did not miss. 

"We're speaking about some people getting a second chance. But there's a lot of people out there, including our youth, that's never gotten a first chance," Williams said as he addressed a mesmerized audience at the Newark office of the non-profit New Jersey Reentry Corporation (NJRC). "What I can do is I can go on them corners, and grab me up somebody, as say 'Brother, what you doing today?' I mentor, and I don't do it by myself. I get my brothers within my circle, and we're putting the wrap around someone. We have to be the wrap around. I'm not waiting for anybody else to be the wrap around my children."

Jesse Owens Rose Triumphant Over Hitler . . . and Roosevelt

February 25, 2020

The Gazette's David Ramsey reports

We enjoy telling the story of Jesse Owens defeating Adolf Hitler. The tale brightens our American spirit, encourages our sense of greatness.

We ignore the story of Owens and his return to the United States. After winning four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Owens was snubbed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who declined to send a congratulatory telegram or invite the world’s greatest athlete to the White House.

Ideas for New Jersey to Increase Voter Participation (Opinion)

February 25, 2020

New Jersey 101.5's Steve Trevelise reports

The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice is looking to increase voter participation and in a new report identifies what it calls four barriers to “a robust, inclusive democracy.” They have recommended 11 changes it says can boost voter participation in the state. Included are mandatory civics classes in high schools, paid time for voting, and same day registration.

Given the significant challenges we face, we have only two options: to embrace chaos or embrace community. We choose community. Join us as we work to bend our neighborhoods toward the beloved community.

 

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