The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice uses cutting-edge racial and social justice advocacy to empower people of color by building reparative systems that create wealth, transform justice and harness democratic power—from the ground up—in New Jersey.

 

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ONWARD!

 

The Institute is thrilled to award our largest honor, the Alan V. and Amy Lowenstein Social Justice Award, to Fred D. Gray, Sr., Esq. at our 16th Annual Gala on Nov. 9, 2021.

Click to RSVP for our 2021 Gala

Join us on November 9 at our 16th Annual Gala – virtual, free and open to all – as we honor some of the voices that have continued to move America and New Jersey Onward!


Last year, more than 10,000 viewed our special celebration. With the stellar line-up we have this year, it’s sure to be just a memorable.
We’ll be honoring:


Fred D. Gray, Sr., Esq., legendary civil rights attorney who represented Dr. Martin Luther King., Jr., Rosa Parks and the victims of the Tuskegee medical experiments;


Dr. Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., Princeton University professor, MSNBC contributor and author of Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own Begin Again, whose powerful commentary on race relations in America has galvanized the nation;


Black Voters Matter, leading national voting rights organization whose foundational work has resulted in record voter registration and turnout in Georgia and whose Freedom Ride for Voting Rights bus tour empowered Black voters across America;


Howard and Meg Jacobs, generous philanthropists whose support has benefited so many New Jersey residents;

and Sheri B. Bronstein, Chief Human Resources Officer for Bank of America, which recently pledged $1.25 billion over the next five years to advance racial equity and economic opportunity.


Don’t miss out! Please RSVP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Voter

 

 

In December 2019 – as a result of the collective advocacy of the 1844 No More Campaign led by the Institute – Governor Murphy signed into law voting rights restoration for 83,000 people on probation and parole in New Jersey.

One of those 83,000 was Ron Pierce, the institute’s Democracy & Justice Fellow, whose political voice was silenced for 34 years.

Watch this screening of Voter, a 15-minute documentary about Ron’s journey from a family where voting was everything, to being incarcerated and losing the vote, to becoming a lead voting rights advocate in NJ.

The screening, held with our partners at NJPAC, is complemented by a discussion including remarks from Governor Murphy, Asw. Shavonda Sumter and other people who have had their votes restored.

Hear from NJ Youth about What They Need to Stay Out of the Criminal Justice System

 

Marking Juneteenth: The Ongoing Quest for Freedom in New Jersey

Watch our Juneteenth panel of Institute experts discussing how to #DoRacialJustice in this critical moment.

 

In the News

Institute Releases Repairing the Cracks: How New Jersey Can Restore Black & Brown Communities Ravaged by COVID-19 and Systemic Racism

October 01, 2021

Institute Releases Repairing the Cracks: How New Jersey Can Restore Black & Brown Communities Ravaged by COVID-19 and Systemic Racism

New Report Explores Reasons for the Disproportionate Impact of the Pandemic and How to Build a Stronger Foundation Going Forward

NEWARK – The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice today released Repairing the Cracks: How New Jersey Can Restore Black & Brown Communities Ravaged by COVID-19 and Systemic Racism

The new report explores the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Black and other communities of color in the Garden State, and proposes policies designed to not only address the immediate harm caused by the public health crisis but also create a stronger, more equitable New Jersey going forward.

“Tragically, it is not surprising that New Jersey’s Black and other communities of color have suffered most from the pandemic, given the deep cracks of structural racism in New Jersey’s foundation,” said Andrea McChristian, Law & Policy Director at the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice. “Under the stress of a devastating public health crisis, those cracks were bound to erupt into earthquakes.”

Responding to Assault Charge at Youth Prison, Institute Renews Call for Closure and Community-Based Programming for Youth People

September 27, 2021

Responding to Assault Charge at Youth Prison, Institute Renews Call for Closure and Community-Based Programming for Youth People

Prison Guard Charged with Breaking Wrist of Handcuffed Youth Without Cause

NEWARK – In response to charges of physical violence by a youth prison guard against an incarcerated young person, the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice condemned the abuse and renewed its call for the closure of New Jersey’s three youth prisons: Jamesburg, Hayes and the Juvenile Medium Security Facility (JMSF), where the incident occurred.

“Violence against incarcerated youth is abhorrent and unacceptable,” stated Yannick Wood, Director of the Criminal Justice Reform Program at the Institute. “It reflects the broken condition of New Jersey’s overfunded and antiquated youth prisons, which are plagued by structural racism, emotional harm and even physical violence.”

Institute and League of Women Voters Urge New Jersey Apportionment Commission to Begin Redistricting Process Now

August 24, 2021

Institute and League of Women Voters Urge New Jersey Apportionment Commission to Begin Redistricting Process Now

Groups Say Law and Public Policy Dictate that August is the “Trigger Date” for Commission to Begin “Conducting its Business”

NEWARK – The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice and the League of Women Voters of New Jersey (the “Groups”) sent a letter  to the New Jersey Apportionment Commission with their analysis that the August release of the Census data was the “trigger date” to begin the process for state legislative redistricting and urging them to begin the process now. 

The Groups argue that despite some uncertainty regarding the trigger date, beginning the process at this time is dictated by the clear language of the recent constitutional amendment and public policy. A copy of the letter can be found here.

“In order for the redrawing of our district maps to be fair and representative of the diverse communities in New Jersey, there must be a robust and deliberate inclusion of public education and input, including public hearings,” said the Groups. “This requires getting started as soon as possible as dictated under current law and with regard to public policy.”

Given the significant challenges we face, we have only two options: to embrace chaos or embrace community. We choose community. Join us as we work to bend our neighborhoods toward the beloved community.

 

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