Community

Over

Chaos

The Institute seeks to ensure that urban residents live in a society that respects their humanity, provides equality of economic opportunity, empowers them to use their voice in the political process, and protects equal justice.

 

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The Institute was proud to host the 1619 Project's Nikole Hannah-Jones and an esteemed panel.

 Watch the livestream here

 

"The United States is a nation founded on both an ideal and a lie."

With her unvarnished 100k at the role Of slavery and its legacy on the making of our nation, Nikole Hannah-Jones tells us that "[w]ithout the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different—it might not be a democracy at all."

The award-winning journalist will discuss the NYT Magazine's 1619 Project, a multi-media initiative marking the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Black people in Jamestown, Virginia, the system of slavery that followed and its enduring legacy in America.

She will be introduced by Shané Harris (Executive Director, The Prudential Foundation), and joined by a distinguished panel of scholars and advocates, moderated by Marcia W. Brown (Rutgers University- Newark), who will bring the conversation home to New Jersey. Panelists include Ryan P. Haygood (President and CEO, New Jersey Institute for Social Justice), Prof. Elise Boddie (The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School), Rev. Charles F. Boyer (Pastor and Founder Of Salvation and Social Justice), Marley Dias (Creator of #1000BlackGirlBooks campaign) and Richard Roper (Public Policy Consultant).

Presented in association with the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, Prudential, The Inclusion Project at Rutgers Law School, and Salvation & Social Justice

Learn About the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice

 

In the News

New Jersey Poised to Lead on Progressive Action with Key Social Justice Legislation

January 16, 2020

 

 

Voting Rights, Prison Gerrymandering, and Apprenticeships Move Forward as Session Ends

 

NEWARK — The closing of the New Jersey legislative session this week marked the passage of several key pieces of social justice legislation advanced by the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice that will help move the state forward to becoming a more racially and socially just state.

“Against a backdrop of national chaos, we have taken substantial strides forward to advance racial and social justice over the 2018-2019 legislative session,” said Ryan P. Haygood, President & CEO of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice. “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. urged us to choose community over chaos in difficult national moments like this one. In New Jersey, we are now choosing community—and we are succeeding in building our democracy from the ground up rather than waiting for it to come to us from Washington, D.C. We are building a New Jersey that will serve as a national bright light for progressive action.”

Public Forum On Juvenile Justice Reform Set For South Jersey

January 10, 2020

Patch.com's Anthony Bellano Reports

A statewide task force charged with helping improve New Jersey's youth justice system is seeking public input, the state attorney general's office announced on Monday. The state is particularly interested in hearing from those who have been directly impacted by the system.

The Task Force for the Continued Transformation of Youth Justice in New Jersey will hold a listening session at KROC Corps Community Center in Camden from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 23. The center is located at 1865 Harrison Avenue in Camden.

"We're calling on members of the community to share their ideas, experiences and opinions related to New Jersey's youth justice system and suggest ways to improve it," said Dr. Jennifer LeBaron, Acting Executive Director of the Juvenile Justice Commission and Chairperson of the Task Force. "We welcome comments about any aspect of the system, but we are particularly interested in feedback on several specific topics of interest."

Fill Out Your Census Form!

January 10, 2020

Jewish Standard's Lois Goldrich Reports

Patricia D. Williamson, the director of New Jersey Counts, a project from the nonprofit, nonpartisan, Newark-based New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, is coming to Teaneck with an important message on January 20.

When you receive your census form, fill it out.

“A full and accurate census in 2020 is essential to ensuring that New Jersey receives the federal funding to which it is entitled,” Ms. Williamson said. After all, the United States Constitution mandates that the census, conducted every 10 years, must count every single person who lives in this country. The 2020 census form is due to be mailed out on March 12 and 13.

Given the significant challenges we face, we have only two options: to embrace chaos or embrace community. We choose community. Join us as we work to bend our neighborhoods toward the beloved community.

 

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