News

The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice Mourns the Death of Drum Major for Justice, Bob Edgar.

The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, with so many Americans who are inspired by a vision of a more just society, mourns the death of Bob Edgar. While the long arc of Bob’s public service might be described with terms such as lawmaker or progressive leader, the words of another clergyman, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., more accurately describe him as a “drum major for justice.” Given the tone with which Bob talked about his family, you would also have to warmly define his life with words like “father,” “husband,” “grandfather,” “son,” or “brother.”

Bob was a Methodist minister who pushed for liberal reforms as a six-term Pennsylvania congressman, a leader of American churches, and President of the citizens lobby known as Common Cause.

 

Princeton University Students Rally Support for "Ban the Box" Legislation

Ray Chao and Brandon Holt, a couple of Princeton University students with a flair for advocacy, have found the perfect way to motivate people to support the state’s pending “ban-the-box” legislation: Self-interest. The Opportunity to Compete bill, introduced in the state Legislature in February, aims to eliminate the notorious “box” that applicants with criminal convictions must check on employment applications, delaying disclosure until farther along in the hiring process.

The box is associated, said Chao and Holt, with hardened criminals, prison sentences and blighted urban communities with a high rate of crime. That public perception, they explained, is skewed. “This is a bill that’s very easy to say, ‘Oh, this doesn’t apply to me, this isn’t my problem,’” said Chao during an interview on campus.

NJISJ 2013 Annual Awards Gala

Please join us for a special night where we celebrate the work we do and honor individuals, organizations and corporations who help us advance our work.

NJISJ 2013 Annual Awards Gala

Thursday June 6, 2013, at 6 pm

Nanina's in the Park

540 Mill St, Belleville, NJ 07109

 

Due Process: Ban the Box Episode

Due Process, a production of Rutgers School of Law–Newark and the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, is an award-winning, critically acclaimed weekly series

tag2

tag1
on law and justice issues. The April 14, 2013 episode focused on the topic: Ban the Box and Opportunity to Compete Act.

NJISJ is proud to have participated in the making of this episode.

To view the episode click here.

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission Hires New Employees to Help with Ongoing Sandy Recovery

The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission has added 10 new employees to assist with its ongoing recovery from Hurricane Sandy.

The new hires, which are all temporary, were coordinated with the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice's Metro Newark Brownfields Training Program, according to a news release.

Off-Road Woes Behind the Bulk of License Suspensions

A 44-year-old Berlin woman was driving in January with a suspended license — one of 52 penalties in her troubled driving history— when she allegedly fled after striking two pedestrians on a Voorhees road.

tag3

Earlier this month, a Mount Ephraim man who allegedly drove off after fatally striking a 67-year-old woman on the Black Horse Pike in Haddon Township hadn’t had a valid license in more than two decades. Timothy Polijczuk’s license had been suspended 58 times since 1980, and he never attempted to restore it after 1989, according to the state Motor Vehicle Commission.

NJISJ Announces Final Metro Newark Brownfields Training Program Graduation

NEWARK, NJ- March 21, 2013. New Jersey Institute for Social Justice is pleased to announce the graduation of its fourth Metro Newark Brownfields Training Program class to be held on March 21 at 6pm at PSE&G Building in downtown Newark. Twenty-one Newark and Essex County residents have completed this pre-apprenticeship program and are now prepared to move on to promising careers in environmental remediation.

Using Criminal Records, Credit Ratings is Risky Business in Hiring

Employers should scrap policies that bar hiring people with criminal records, and should avoid using credit reports to screen job candidates, employment-law attorneys told a business group Tuesday.

Considering a prospective employee's arrest or criminal record, or inquiring about their credit status, before even offering them a job, are practices that can put a company at risk of violating federal law, said Jeffrey Burstein, senior trial lawyer for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Newark, and Catherine Wells, head of the employment law department at Wolff Samson in West Orange. Burstein and Wells were speakers at a roundtable, held at the Hilton&nbspHasbrouck Heights about making employment decisions under Title VII, which forbids discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin.

Youth Radio Discusses Ban the Box in Newark

Ban the Box in Newark According to the National Employment Law Center (NELP), about 65 million Americans have a criminal record. The rapid expansion of online record searches has made it easier for employers to run background checks on potential employees, and more challenging for potential employees to get a job.

According to a 2010 survey by the Society for Human Resources Management, nearly 90 percent of employers surveyed, revealed that they conducted criminal background checks on job applicants. Ban the Box is a movement to get rid of questions on job applications that ask about criminal history. 

NJISJ has Graduation for Metro Newark Brownfields Training Program

NEWARK, NJ- December 11, 2012. The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice is pleased to announce the graduation of its second Metro Newark Brownfields Training Program class was held on Tuesday, December 11 at 5:30pm at New Jersey Historical Society. (read more)

 

tag1